"Glass to commemorate and to celebrate"

A major advancement in the making of glass was George Ravenscroft's usage of lead oxide in the chemical makeup of glass in 1674. This meant glass got a more transparent, clearer and sparkling appearance as well as increased strength. This also meant that the engravings on glass became more elaborate, which can be seen in the glasses present. The engravings were done in two techniques. First the diamond-point technique, with a tiny diamond on a pen, which allowed free decorations. Second, the wheel-cut technique; in which the glass is held against a rotating copper wheel, which gives a fine matte decoration against the lustrous background.
 

The Dutch have a long tradition of drinking games, and various glasses were made to get your guests as drunk as possible, the sooner the better. The Dutch liked (and still like) their drinks, and also during celebratory moments, the glass was raised. Often, with birth, marriage or any other family celebration, special glasses were made that were used to toast with and that would be passed to one another. But also amongst colleagues drinking was greatly appreciated. The glasses present show that the different chambers of the East and West India Trading Companies drank on the welfare of their ships and trade, and the glass welcoming people to Batavia shows that even upon arrival drinks were mandatory.

A GLASS WITH THE ENGRAVING OF AN EAST-INDIAMAN AND WITH TEXT "HET WEL VAAREN VAN DE OOSTINDISCHE COMPAGNIE"

 

The glass English, engraving Dutch, second half 18th century

 

With wheel-cut engraving of a ship at sea, the wind in the sails, lobed stem and widening cup.

 

H. 18 / Diam. cup 8 cm
 

A RARE GLASS WITH THE ENGRAVING OF AN EAST-INDIAMAN AND WITH TEXT "WELLE KOM OP BATAVIA"


German glass, engraving possibly Jakarta (Batavia), last quarter 18th century 

 

With wheel-cut engraving of a ship at anchor, near a coast with trees, plain stem with knob, a facetted ring, with partly-facetted cup above.

 

H. 18.5 cm

Note:

The engraving on this glass is not particularly well-done, which probably means it was done in Batavia, which is quite rare.

A GLASS WITH THE ENGRAVING OF AN EAST-INDIAMAN AND WITH TEXT "HET OOSTINDISCHE COMPAGNIES WEL VAREN"


German/Bohemian glass, engraving Dutch, second half 18th century 

 

With wheel-cut engraving of a ship at anchor, near a coast with trees, plain stem with knob, a facetted ring, with partly-facetted cup above.

 

H. 17.4 / Diam. cup 8 cm

A GLASS WITH THE ENGRAVING OF A COUNTRYSIDE WITH FARMERS, HERDSMEN AND AN EAST-INDIAMAN IN THE BACKGROUND, WITH TEXT "HET LANDS WELVAREN"


German/Bohemian glass, engraving Dutch, second half 18th century 

 

With widening cup with facetted lower part, above facetted stem and domed foot. 

 

H. 17.9 / Diam. cup 7.6 cm

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